Are You Happy?

happychildren cropped.png

When Abdu’l-Baha came to North America, He would often ask people, “Are you happy?”

I’m not sure how that went over with folks back then. To me the question is a bit on the personal side. Maybe even intrusive. But it is all in the delivery. So why did the Master ask this question so often? Maybe happiness is more important to us in this world than we give it credit. After all when Browne visited with Baha’u’llah Himself, didn’t he hear the following words:

We desire but the good of the world and the happiness of the nations…

From this, it would seem that atleast one of Baha’u’llah’s goals is for us to be happy. Hmm… so maybe there is more to this happiness business. Think about it for a second. Just give it a go. Ask yourself, am I happy?

You don’t have to tell anyone. Just contemplate the question for yourself. If you’d like, you can of course share the results by leaving a comment below (anonymously if you like).

Someone who has achieved happiness is Matthieu Ricard – or so it would seem from his MRI scans. The 60 year old Ricard is the French interpreter for the Dalai Lama and as a Buddhist has meditated for more than 10,000 hours.

Ricard claims that, “Our life can be greatly transformed by even a minimal change in how we manage our thoughts and perceive and interpret the world. Happiness is a skill. It requires effort and time.” He has written a book on happiness which will be published next month (Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life’s Most Important Skill). If you can’t wait, check out his previous book, The Monk and the Philosopher.

Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill Mattieu RicardI observed an interesting phenomena when I shared Ricard’s story with my friends. The response of my fellow Baha’is was quite homogenous and ran along the line of, “This man knows nothing. True happiness is only achieved through Baha’u’llah.” Meanwhile, the response of my non-Baha’i friends was quite heterogeneous running from atheists who scoffed at his Buddhist beliefs to those who were quite interested to learn more about him and meditation. There were was even one who went on a caffeine induced rant on the merits of meditation and their practice of it.

I dare hypothesize that had Abdu’l-Baha met (or even hear of Ricard) He would have been quite pleased and showered him with praise and love. I imagine that because I’ve read many vignettes of Him meeting fervent believers (of other religions) where He only offered them love and praise. He never admonished them, rebuked them or seemed at all haughty… claiming that they were wasting their time since Baha’u’llah has now come.

Sadly I find that this sort of mistake is made by a lot of Baha’is. I made it too for a long time (too long). I often thought of the Baha’i Faith, and by proxy myself, as somewhat superior. It was the last and most recent religion, was it not? It did have all the answers, right?

Sigh.

How foolish I feel when I think back to those times.

Ignorance is truly bliss.

  • I’m puzzled by your post. It might sound harsh for a Baha’i to say that the Baha’i Faith is superior to other religions, and I’ve never heard one say that in so many words, but isn’t that basically what the Baha’i Faith teaches, in the sense that it’s the only religion relevant to the modern age, and all others are obsolete (and distorted to boot)? Why would there be such an emphasis in the Writings on teaching if it didn’t matter whether or not people were Baha’i?

    It’s true that there are vignettes of Abdu’l-Baha being nice to non-Baha’is without calling upon them to join the Faith. But then there are times when he told people the beliefs of X religion are wrong, and the truth is found in the Baha’i teachings.

  • I’m puzzled by your post. It might sound harsh for a Baha’i to say that the Baha’i Faith is superior to other religions, and I’ve never heard one say that in so many words, but isn’t that basically what the Baha’i Faith teaches, in the sense that it’s the only religion relevant to the modern age, and all others are obsolete (and distorted to boot)? Why would there be such an emphasis in the Writings on teaching if it didn’t matter whether or not people were Baha’i?

    It’s true that there are vignettes of Abdu’l-Baha being nice to non-Baha’is without calling upon them to join the Faith. But then there are times when he told people the beliefs of X religion are wrong, and the truth is found in the Baha’i teachings.

  • Jonah,
    the difference is that Abdu’l-Baha’s words originate from love whereas the reaction from Baha’is towards Ricard originates from pride and disdain. People can instantly sense such things. And it turns them off. As it should.

  • Jonah,
    the difference is that Abdu’l-Baha’s words originate from love whereas the reaction from Baha’is towards Ricard originates from pride and disdain. People can instantly sense such things. And it turns them off. As it should.

  • Jonah wrote
    “Why would there be such an emphasis in the Writings on teaching if it didn’t matter whether or not people were Baha’i?”

    Here’s how ‘Abdu’l-Baha defines “being a Baha’i”

    “To be a Baha’i simply means to love all the world; to love humanity and try to serve it; to work for universal peace and universal brotherhood.” – Abdu’l-Baha

    That quote can be found on the official website of the Baha’is of the United States – http://www.bahai.us/being-bahai

    As Baquia says, ‘Abdu’l-Baha’s words originate from love. Teaching is love, not conversion. Being a Baha’i is love, not feelings of superiority.

  • Jonah wrote
    “Why would there be such an emphasis in the Writings on teaching if it didn’t matter whether or not people were Baha’i?”

    Here’s how ‘Abdu’l-Baha defines “being a Baha’i”

    “To be a Baha’i simply means to love all the world; to love humanity and try to serve it; to work for universal peace and universal brotherhood.” – Abdu’l-Baha

    That quote can be found on the official website of the Baha’is of the United States – http://www.bahai.us/being-bahai

    As Baquia says, ‘Abdu’l-Baha’s words originate from love. Teaching is love, not conversion. Being a Baha’i is love, not feelings of superiority.

  • Jonah wrote
    ?Why would there be such an emphasis in the Writings on teaching if it didn’t matter whether or not people were Baha’i??

    Here’s how ?Abdu’l-Baha defines ?being a Baha’i?

    ?To be a Baha’i simply means to love all the world; to love humanity and try to serve it; to work for universal peace and universal brotherhood.? – Abdu’l-Baha

    I’m sorry, I still don’t understand. You would agree with me, wouldn’t you, that there is a strong emphasis on the importance of teaching, both in the Baha’i Writings and in the Plans? Why is teaching important?

  • Jonah wrote
    ?Why would there be such an emphasis in the Writings on teaching if it didn’t matter whether or not people were Baha’i??

    Here’s how ?Abdu’l-Baha defines ?being a Baha’i?

    ?To be a Baha’i simply means to love all the world; to love humanity and try to serve it; to work for universal peace and universal brotherhood.? – Abdu’l-Baha

    I’m sorry, I still don’t understand. You would agree with me, wouldn’t you, that there is a strong emphasis on the importance of teaching, both in the Baha’i Writings and in the Plans? Why is teaching important?

  • David

    To be a Bahai Teacher!

    This is a vast subject that a selection of quotes could never adequately explain – as one needs to practice the art with deep reflection.

    My own definition of spiritual teaching is:

    Applying virtues and wise counsel in every situation – with the realisation that these are inspired by the Divine.

    The question of which system to teach is personal.

    For Bahai’s it is personal study and prayer, active participation in the faith, and service to others.

    The art of teaching, I believe, requires that every human is to be both a teacher and learner.

    But teaching and learning is not easy. We have to overcome prejudices, develop strategies, step into the unknown, and reflect deeply on mysteries of creation.

    Nevertheless, people I feel are the best feedback to see if you are doing this correctly. Thus, the need to teach is established.

    Furthermore, we have to reflect deeply on our own motivations:

    “Not by the force of numbers, not by the mere exposition of a set of new and noble principles, not by an organized campaign of teaching — no matter how world-wide and elaborate in its character — not even by the staunchness of our faith or the exaltation of our enthusiasm, can we ultimately hope to vindicate in the eyes of a critical and sceptical age the supreme claim of the Abha Revelation. One thing, and only one thing, will unfailingly and alone secure the undoubted triumph of this sacred Cause, namely, the extent to which our own inner life and private character mirror forth in their manifold aspects the splendour of those eternal principles proclaimed by Bah??’u’ll??h.”

    Thus the priority for the spiritual warrior is to apply virtues in all situations, and to meditate deeply upon why, and how effectively, they are doing this – regardless to which faith they prescribe teaching is universal.

  • David

    To be a Bahai Teacher!

    This is a vast subject that a selection of quotes could never adequately explain – as one needs to practice the art with deep reflection.

    My own definition of spiritual teaching is:

    Applying virtues and wise counsel in every situation – with the realisation that these are inspired by the Divine.

    The question of which system to teach is personal.

    For Bahai’s it is personal study and prayer, active participation in the faith, and service to others.

    The art of teaching, I believe, requires that every human is to be both a teacher and learner.

    But teaching and learning is not easy. We have to overcome prejudices, develop strategies, step into the unknown, and reflect deeply on mysteries of creation.

    Nevertheless, people I feel are the best feedback to see if you are doing this correctly. Thus, the need to teach is established.

    Furthermore, we have to reflect deeply on our own motivations:

    “Not by the force of numbers, not by the mere exposition of a set of new and noble principles, not by an organized campaign of teaching — no matter how world-wide and elaborate in its character — not even by the staunchness of our faith or the exaltation of our enthusiasm, can we ultimately hope to vindicate in the eyes of a critical and sceptical age the supreme claim of the Abha Revelation. One thing, and only one thing, will unfailingly and alone secure the undoubted triumph of this sacred Cause, namely, the extent to which our own inner life and private character mirror forth in their manifold aspects the splendour of those eternal principles proclaimed by Bah??’u’ll??h.”

    Thus the priority for the spiritual warrior is to apply virtues in all situations, and to meditate deeply upon why, and how effectively, they are doing this – regardless to which faith they prescribe teaching is universal.

  • Hello? Is this thing on?

    My question is this: Doesn’t the Baha’i Faith in some sense claim superiority over other religions? I appreciate the thoughts expressed by Baquia, Steve and David and their generosity in trying to help me. But none of them have actually addressed my question. Saying that Abdu’l-Baha (or anyone else) spoke in love doesn’t preclude him speaking with a sense of superiority. You can be loving and superior at the same time.

    Let me use as an example a passage (from Shoghi Effendi?) that David quoted in his last comment:

    … not even by the staunchness of our faith or the exaltation of our enthusiasm, can we ultimately hope to vindicate in the eyes of a critical and sceptical age the supreme claim of the Abha Revelation. One thing, and only one thing, will unfailingly and alone secure the undoubted triumph of this sacred Cause …

    Now, what is the supreme claim of the Abha Revelation? Why is it necessary to secure the undoubted triumph of this sacred Cause?

  • Hello? Is this thing on?

    My question is this: Doesn’t the Baha’i Faith in some sense claim superiority over other religions? I appreciate the thoughts expressed by Baquia, Steve and David and their generosity in trying to help me. But none of them have actually addressed my question. Saying that Abdu’l-Baha (or anyone else) spoke in love doesn’t preclude him speaking with a sense of superiority. You can be loving and superior at the same time.

    Let me use as an example a passage (from Shoghi Effendi?) that David quoted in his last comment:

    … not even by the staunchness of our faith or the exaltation of our enthusiasm, can we ultimately hope to vindicate in the eyes of a critical and sceptical age the supreme claim of the Abha Revelation. One thing, and only one thing, will unfailingly and alone secure the undoubted triumph of this sacred Cause …

    Now, what is the supreme claim of the Abha Revelation? Why is it necessary to secure the undoubted triumph of this sacred Cause?

  • Jonah,
    I think there are Baha’is that believe their Faith to be superior to other religions, but I have yet to find anything in the Baha’i Writings which support this.

    As you know, the Baha’i Faith believes in progressive revelation and that it is only the latest religion in a line which goes into the past and will extend into the future infinitely.

    As for you Q re the necessity to secure triumph for the Cause, this kind of flowery language is in all religions and all it means is that the believers have a duty to their Faith. A duty to participate, implement the teachings, give financial support, teach, etc.

  • Jonah,
    I think there are Baha’is that believe their Faith to be superior to other religions, but I have yet to find anything in the Baha’i Writings which support this.

    As you know, the Baha’i Faith believes in progressive revelation and that it is only the latest religion in a line which goes into the past and will extend into the future infinitely.

    As for you Q re the necessity to secure triumph for the Cause, this kind of flowery language is in all religions and all it means is that the believers have a duty to their Faith. A duty to participate, implement the teachings, give financial support, teach, etc.

  • I think there are Baha’is that believe their Faith to be superior to other religions, but I have yet to find anything in the Baha’i Writings which support this.

    Since this thread has dropped from the first page of your blog, maybe it’d be a good idea to move the discussion (if anyone’s still reading) to my blog. Click my name above to go there.

    My short answer is see the Promulgation of Universal Peace, pp. 433-436, for an example. Abdu’l-Baha might be speaking in love, but he is most definitely saying that the Baha’i Faith is superior to the other existing religions. I’ll expand on that on my blog.

  • I think there are Baha’is that believe their Faith to be superior to other religions, but I have yet to find anything in the Baha’i Writings which support this.

    Since this thread has dropped from the first page of your blog, maybe it’d be a good idea to move the discussion (if anyone’s still reading) to my blog. Click my name above to go there.

    My short answer is see the Promulgation of Universal Peace, pp. 433-436, for an example. Abdu’l-Baha might be speaking in love, but he is most definitely saying that the Baha’i Faith is superior to the other existing religions. I’ll expand on that on my blog.

  • Pingback: Baha’i superiority « Baha’i-Catholic Blog()

  • Baquia

    Jonah, the PoUP is not an authoritative Baha'i text. That is to say we do not have reason to believe that Abdu'l-Baha said those exact words because the words were not written by Abdu'l-Baha and the transcription/translation of the speeches was not checked by Abdu'l-Baha. For example, the book Some Answered Questions is considered authoritiative because although it was written through an interview style process, Abdu'l-Baha checked the transcript before it was published. Hope that clears it up.

  • farhan

    Jonah, the telephone directory of this year is not “better” than that of last year, but SOME numbers have been updated. It so happens that the Baha'i Faith confirms previous dispensations and updates some aspects, but it is merely a new chapter in God's educative enterprise for humanity.

  • farhan

    Jonah, i agree with Baquia: the PUP is not authoritative, no more that Paris Talks and only part of SAQ has been proof read by Abdu'l-Baha. Although these books are very precious for throwing further light when in accordance to authoritative writings, they cannot be considerd if in any way in opposition to those writings.

  • Craig Parke

    But what about when ALL the telephone numbers in the new phone book are now disconnected like is the current technological situation in Iran? Leaders of “organized religions” always end up disconnecting the numbers in the new phone book. The current leadership of the Baha'i Faith has turned out to be no different. They own the phone book and they can do whatever they want without answering to anyone in Heaven or Earth. It is the same old, same old. It is embarrassing. I feel sorry for these people. As spiritual archetypes as human beings they are going to look very, very bad in world history.

    The technology of the Internet is the Second Coming. The technology of the Internet is the Revelation of Heaven. Our guys are sound asleep. So be it. Judgment Day has come. The new phone book cannot be stopped. It can be re-programmed over night forever.

    Everyone keep posting.

  • farhan

    Craig wrote: Leaders of “organized religions” always end up disconnecting the numbers in the new phone book

    Craig, the row in Iran is between voters for candidates chosen amongst many others by the religious leaders. It is a fratricide conflict within a belief system, with it’s consequences on social life. On the other hand, I see no connection with the Baha’i administration. A Baha’i is someone who recognises and believes in a new dispensation (telephone book) but it is up to him to decide if he phones and to whom he phones. No one is obliged to submit to the decisions of the elected officers, unless they wish to participate in community life. You can sing as you wish in your shower, but have to abide by rules if you participate in an organised choir.

  • Craig Parke

    Farhan,

    What if a person realizes that the choir they are singing in is completely tone deaf? What if a person realizes they have not sold a hit record in 40 years because they cannot sing at all and the musicians in their orchestra cannot play? What if a person realizes that the choir they are singing in has zero musical ability? What if the choir directors who cannot sing on key themselves say the problem is that everyone has to read musical notes first that they learn how to do in workbooks that they take over and over? They must then teach everyone else to read musical notes too and recruit everyone else on Earth to teach others rote note reading. But, meanwhile, no one can actually play anything from their own heart. In fact, no one can play for s**t! They can't apply anything they know to an actual piece of music. Zero. Nada. Zippo. They can't even play scales! They have no hand-eye coordination from reading the note to making a musical sound on any kind of beautiful musical instrument. Who wants to go to a “concert” where mobs of people just randomly scream out the notes they can read “G-G-A-B-C#”

    But, meanwhile, other people just pick up their instruments and start playing from their own God given ability. They just play because they feel the music, while the Baha'i “professional lifetime incumbent theorist class clergy” AO totally destroy all human musical creativity and musical initiative worldwide across the entire planet in every land by top down dictating the only notes that everyone is permitted to play?

    Why not just let people actually play like these below links instead of masses of “monkey see-monkey do” monkeys screaming out musical notes they now think they can “read” off of a paper page? That is not “music” at all! Music is actually playing.

    The choir and the orchestra cannot play because they have zero ability from groupthink methods.

    The object is to actually play music:

    Learn the chords and the lyrics yourself and start playing. The entire world will completely build out the World Age while the Baha'is scream out note names on paper with their heads completely up their a**es under a lifetime incumbent theocracy of completely and totally impaired people.

    Just learn your instrument your self and play!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FqA2WINPF4

    Just learn your instrument your self and play!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1yaxHJbg_o

    Just learn your instrument your self and play!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdIpiFvCvNg

    Just get your head out of your a** and start playing once you have mastered your instrument!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TEF470mXqU4

  • farhan

    Craig wrote : But, meanwhile, other people just pick up their instruments and start playing from their own God given ability.

    Wonderful, Craig, let everyone work towards a noble cause; one way of doing so is a collective action within the Baha’i community. History will show which choice was the most efficient and people will then adopt the path of service that suits them best.

  • fubar

    bias disclosure: I was coerced into signing a bahai declaration card in 1972. I formally submitted a request several years ago to be removed from bahai membership, but the USBNC would not honor that request unless I responded to an insluting request by them that I provide an admission that I was incapable of following bahai laws, or had some other spiritual deficiency that prevented me from continuing to observe and practice the religion. they completely ignored the fact that my resignation was a protest of a specific abuse of authority by the head of a sub-unit of bahai administration.

    Ok. main point: have you guys ever read the beginning of the bahai “most holy book”, the aqdas?

    At least in the official english translation, the triumphalism and exclusivism pretty much jump right off the page:

    all belief is subsumed under the image of bahaullah as prophet.

    do “ifs”, “ands” or “buts”.

    http://bahai-library.com/writings/bahaullah/aqd

    excerpt:
    | The first duty prescribed by God for His servants is the recognition of
    | Him Who is the Dayspring of His Revelation and the Fountain of His
    | laws, Who representeth the Godhead in both the Kingdom of His
    | Cause and the world of creation. Whoso achieveth this duty hath
    | attained unto all good; and whoso is deprived thereof hath gone
    | astray, though he be the author of every righteous deed.

    The above is clearly yet another refresh of the basic blueprint for religious insanity that has been present in western religion for thousands of years.

    It is completely incoherent with reference with other humanitarian principles used to “market” the relion to potential converts, and can not be rationally reconciled with the “love” theme, or the universal evolution of spirit toward compassion and altruism.

    The problem is that bahai universalism isn't really universal.

    The philosophical underpinning of bahai universalism itself has major problems, as explained by Ken Wilber:

    http://www.vastsky.org/Audio_Video.html

    click “Four Paths Four Destinations”

    | Ken Wilber discusses the popular idea that the worlds religions all have
    | a transendant unity, that the forms are all different but their inner
    | emptiness is the same. Its just not true!

    Pure (gross)
    Illumine (subtle)
    Causal (formless, very subtle)
    Unification (nondual, suchness)

    Note: compare this scheme with the bahai ring symbol.

    Wilber mentions “Zen At War”.

  • fubar

    bias disclosure: I was coerced into signing a bahai declaration card in 1972. I formally submitted a request several years ago to be removed from bahai membership, but the USBNC would not honor that request unless I responded to an insluting request by them that I provide an admission that I was incapable of following bahai laws, or had some other spiritual deficiency that prevented me from continuing to observe and practice the religion. they completely ignored the fact that my resignation was a protest of a specific abuse of authority by the head of a sub-unit of bahai administration.

    Ok. main point: have you guys ever read the beginning of the bahai “most holy book”, the aqdas?

    At least in the official english translation, the triumphalism and exclusivism pretty much jump right off the page:

    all belief is subsumed under the image of bahaullah as prophet.

    do “ifs”, “ands” or “buts”.

    http://bahai-library.com/writings/bahaullah/aqd

    excerpt:
    | The first duty prescribed by God for His servants is the recognition of
    | Him Who is the Dayspring of His Revelation and the Fountain of His
    | laws, Who representeth the Godhead in both the Kingdom of His
    | Cause and the world of creation. Whoso achieveth this duty hath
    | attained unto all good; and whoso is deprived thereof hath gone
    | astray, though he be the author of every righteous deed.

    The above is clearly yet another refresh of the basic blueprint for religious insanity that has been present in western religion for thousands of years.

    It is completely incoherent with reference with other humanitarian principles used to “market” the relion to potential converts, and can not be rationally reconciled with the “love” theme, or the universal evolution of spirit toward compassion and altruism.

    The problem is that bahai universalism isn't really universal.

    The philosophical underpinning of bahai universalism itself has major problems, as explained by Ken Wilber:

    http://www.vastsky.org/Audio_Video.html

    click “Four Paths Four Destinations”

    | Ken Wilber discusses the popular idea that the worlds religions all have
    | a transendant unity, that the forms are all different but their inner
    | emptiness is the same. Its just not true!

    Pure (gross)
    Illumine (subtle)
    Causal (formless, very subtle)
    Unification (nondual, suchness)

    Note: compare this scheme with the bahai ring symbol.

    Wilber mentions “Zen At War”.

  • juneji

    I'm not a Bahai, but I associated closely with a number of them for quite a few years. The one thing that turned me off the Bahai faith was their belief that some how they were more “enlightened” than those who were not. I think all religions have this problem to one degree or another. Bahais can learn a lot from non Bahais and vice verse.
    We all can contribute in different ways. It is an insult to one's intellect that only works done in the service of Bahallulha can actually have any lasting influence.
    It's been over 10 years since my involvement with the Bahais. Since then, my career has taken off and I have helped hundreds of thousands of people. I get fan letters worldwide everyday. The Bahais' that I knew, have reached a certain measure of professional success, but where is their impact on the world? other than “teaching” in third world countries? Where is the Art, Music, Literature that these “enlightened” people are suppose to create?
    Sorry to sound like a party pooper, but I found this website by chance and it was nice to hear a critical voice about the Bahai Faith. I had invested years of my time with my “Bahai” friends, only to have them slowly cool off on me when they realized that I was never going to convert.

  • fubar

    juneji,

    thanks for the contribution to the discussion.

    you are correct in observing that many bahais are only narrowly interested in people that are potential “converts”, or that otherwise act in a manner that supports an atmposhere of “bahai superiority”.

    the religion has scriptures that exhort followers to be detached from ego. this was obviously just copied from previous religion, but is a correct spiritual principle. however, many bahais have inflated egos and other psychological pathologies that arise from the cultural imperialism that the religion was founded on.

    thanks for dedicating yourself to both selfless service to humanity and to intellectual integrity.

    the reality is that most people like yourself that are in the bahai faith are used and exploited to main a system of “haifan bahai royalty” and dehumanizing bureaucracy.

    you are almost certainly far better off not being in the haifan bahai organization.

    have a nice day.

  • fubar

    jonah,

    yes, haifan bahaism is a religion that is culturally imperialistic. as is islam and christianity.

    the metaphysical framework in the judeo-christian-islamic religions (including bahai) is “universalist”, which means that it is premised on building empire, and creating slave classes, and oppressing serfs and peasants in the maintenance of such an empire.

    in reality there are many valid paths to spirituality and transcendence, and some of them are far better than haifan bahaism for people that are not interested in limited models of “cultural imperialism” such as are maintained in bahai theology.

    if you can somehow stomach reading the horrid stuff, the late writings of shoghi effendi (world leader of haifan bahaism from 1930s to 1950s) contain explicit statements that were hostile to national liberation movements after WWII (formerly colonized people fighting for basic human decency and the right to form democracies). in those same materials shoghi states that his dismal vision of a bahai-domininated future global society was for there to be a hybrid global bahai empire that combined the isalmic and christian empires and subjugated cultures and religions that would not conform. it is clear that democracy is not compatible with haifan bahaism's sick vision of a “spiritually pure” society ruled by “infallibles”.

    the ultimate absurdity of such backward theology is the bahai concept of infallibility of haifan bahaism's incompetent bureaucratic leadership.

    there are many corrupt ideas in haifan bahaism, and many bizarre inconsistencies.

    it is a religion that praises some high ideas and priniciples (which were invented by others), and still maintains many many many other ideas that are backward and medieval.

    haifan bahaism will never be a religion at the leading edge of emergent culture or social evolution or enlightened thought.

  • waiho

    nice post! It’s a learning process, at least now we know, how to approach and tell them in a kind and non-offensive way 🙂
    All of these needs time, love and patience,

    “Where there is love, nothing is too much trouble, and there is always time” – The Master.

    Cheers

  • Anonymous

    waiho, I’m not sure who you’re referring when you say “how to approach and tell them in a kind and non-offensive way”

    In any case, meditation is an often forgotten component of spirituality. One that, unlike prayer, has been shown to have beneficial effects and to ‘rewire’ the human brain.

    Oh and I’ve updated the post above to provide a link to Ricard’s book.

    Thanks for stopping by 🙂

  • Gerard Gregory

    True happiness is only achieved through Baha’u’llah.?

  • I see they have inherited Grays fashion sense

     

    ?This man knows
    nothing. True happiness is only achieved through Baha’u’llah.?

    Yup, the above sums up
    my own experience with the vast number of Baha’i I’ve known and it’s pretty
    much stuff like this which ultimately led to my decision to distance myself
    from the Baha’i community.

    Glad to see that you
    don’t seem to agree with the other Baha’is regarding Mathieu. Also, while it’s impossible
    to know what AB’s reaction would actually be, I agree with your assessment.

    Thanks for the interesting post.