Baha’i Ruhi Institute Course

Thanks to Steve for this gem from Baha’i Studies:

In order to advance to an A cluster a certain number of people must complete a few of the courses. Since I don’t really learn anything or enjoy Ruhi I was wondering if there is some way one can ‘do’ a course without going in a course with others. Would I be able to do it in my own time and write my answers in the book and then get it checked off by a tutor? That way I could do it quicker rather than prolonging the agony.

Oh the agony! I hear you David. I hear you. As Steve points out there is a way to do the Ruhi courses online. You can fill in the empty spaces, pull down the TRUE/FALSE menus and voila! (don’t forget to hit submit) You’re that one step closer to being a Sector A or B or whatever the heck they’ve cooked up now.

I’m sure this is exactly what Baha’u’llah had in mind when He wrote His mystical writings and asked us to immerse ourselves in the ocean of His Revelation… I’m sure He meant fill in the blank type questions which even a lobotomized rhesus monkey would find boring.

[eyeroll]

You know, as a commentator on the state of the Baha’i community, I work very hard at my satire. So it is damned infuriating when they do all the work for me. I just feel cheated. You know?

[kicks a pebble]

Sheesh…

ruhi-institute-course-sector-a.png
The community finally reached Sector A++ level

Related:

  • http://www.whitehanky.blogspot.com White Hanky

    Steve and Baquia: is it just me or did you find this question/statement in number 8 b/c somewhat alarming?
    ‘Something is correct when it is in agreement with the opinions of other people. (Yes/No) followed by ‘Something is correct when it is in agreement with the teaching of God.’ (Yes/No)

    This follows on what Baquia has been posting on ‘independent search for Truth’ and personally I do not think it is as easy as a Yes/No tick in the box

    Blessings and back to contemplating worm castings
    WH

  • http://www.whitehanky.blogspot.com White Hanky

    Steve and Baquia: is it just me or did you find this question/statement in number 8 b/c somewhat alarming?
    ‘Something is correct when it is in agreement with the opinions of other people. (Yes/No) followed by ‘Something is correct when it is in agreement with the teaching of God.’ (Yes/No)

    This follows on what Baquia has been posting on ‘independent search for Truth’ and personally I do not think it is as easy as a Yes/No tick in the box

    Blessings and back to contemplating worm castings
    WH

  • http://bahaisonline.net Steve Marshall

    I’m loath to discuss Ruhi because I haven’t attended any of the courses. On paper it looks fairly awful, but I have heard that a good collaborator/tutor/whatever can bring it alive. however, I’ve already been to enough Baha’i-organised studies that end up being a pointless sharing of ignorance (PSI), and I plan to pass on this one. Besides, if I ever want a PSI, I can grab a massive dose within seconds from t.r.b. in the comfort of my own home.

    Maybe these Ruhi yes/no/parrot-the-answer-from-the-supplied-quote exercises are just a starting point for some deep discussion. If so, that’s great, but I suspect that random chapters from Winnie the Pooh would have done the job just as well (I recommend A.A. Milne over Disney, by the way).

    I understand Ruhi has its roots in rural Colombia, and I think it shows — in the paint-by-numbers approach and the choice of content. I suspect that the Ruhi books are too black-and-white for many urbanised western participants. I’m also guessing that a Ruhi course in Canada is a very different affair to one in Djibouti, despite all the talk about how wonderfully uniform and global it all is.

    The point of Ruhi seems to be to train willing workers for the cause, in the manner of an ant colony. Ants get trained up to scout, forage, soldier and nurse. Baha’is get trained up to home-visit, take children’s classes, devotional meetings and study circles …or yet more Ruhi. It’s all a bit too regimented and prescriptive for my liking, but social insects and some Baha’is do seem to go for it.

  • http://bahaisonline.net Steve Marshall

    I’m loath to discuss Ruhi because I haven’t attended any of the courses. On paper it looks fairly awful, but I have heard that a good collaborator/tutor/whatever can bring it alive. however, I’ve already been to enough Baha’i-organised studies that end up being a pointless sharing of ignorance (PSI), and I plan to pass on this one. Besides, if I ever want a PSI, I can grab a massive dose within seconds from t.r.b. in the comfort of my own home.

    Maybe these Ruhi yes/no/parrot-the-answer-from-the-supplied-quote exercises are just a starting point for some deep discussion. If so, that’s great, but I suspect that random chapters from Winnie the Pooh would have done the job just as well (I recommend A.A. Milne over Disney, by the way).

    I understand Ruhi has its roots in rural Colombia, and I think it shows — in the paint-by-numbers approach and the choice of content. I suspect that the Ruhi books are too black-and-white for many urbanised western participants. I’m also guessing that a Ruhi course in Canada is a very different affair to one in Djibouti, despite all the talk about how wonderfully uniform and global it all is.

    The point of Ruhi seems to be to train willing workers for the cause, in the manner of an ant colony. Ants get trained up to scout, forage, soldier and nurse. Baha’is get trained up to home-visit, take children’s classes, devotional meetings and study circles …or yet more Ruhi. It’s all a bit too regimented and prescriptive for my liking, but social insects and some Baha’is do seem to go for it.

  • http://blendmonthly.blogspot.com Todd Brogan

    I have come to enjoy Ruhi. However, it does offer a very restricted method of discussion. I kind of view it as a decent way to get all Baha’is “on the same page” as to what the basics of this faith are. However, it does run the risk of becoming a reactionary production of orthodoxy–”oh, there are gay Baha’is, Baha’is who drink, etc, let’s edit these books with more Guardian quotes to put these people in line.” However, in my personal experience, I have not had this problem. I do disdain the “cluster” process, however. No other religion that I’m aware of has a “rating” system for “how good is your community?”

  • http://blendmonthly.blogspot.com Todd Brogan

    I have come to enjoy Ruhi. However, it does offer a very restricted method of discussion. I kind of view it as a decent way to get all Baha’is “on the same page” as to what the basics of this faith are. However, it does run the risk of becoming a reactionary production of orthodoxy–”oh, there are gay Baha’is, Baha’is who drink, etc, let’s edit these books with more Guardian quotes to put these people in line.” However, in my personal experience, I have not had this problem. I do disdain the “cluster” process, however. No other religion that I’m aware of has a “rating” system for “how good is your community?”

  • http://www.bahairants.com Baquia

    Todd, if you follow the links I provide at the bottom of the post: Ruhi and Ruhi Redux, I go into this and explain why I disagree.

    I kind of view it as a decent way to get all Baha’is ?on the same page? as to what the basics of this faith are.

  • http://www.bahairants.com Baquia

    Todd, if you follow the links I provide at the bottom of the post: Ruhi and Ruhi Redux, I go into this and explain why I disagree.

    I kind of view it as a decent way to get all Baha’is ?on the same page? as to what the basics of this faith are.

  • http://blendmonthly.blogspot.com Todd Brogan

    I’ll check it out.

  • http://blendmonthly.blogspot.com Todd Brogan

    I’ll check it out.

  • http://www.bahairants.com Baquia

    sure, let me know what you think afterwards

  • http://www.bahairants.com Baquia

    sure, let me know what you think afterwards

  • Priscilla Gilman

    “Getting on the same page” never seemed to me to be a crying need in the Faith. On the contrary, it always bothered me that the same few quotes were trotted out endlessly to support the same stiff parrotted ideas. I can only imagine Ruhi is making this worse. I see a more diverse relationship to the writings in those on the web, and I think it is better.

    The passages an idividual memorizes should be chosen by the need of their own heart and mind. A good teacher to challenge you is a good thing too. But the words about valuing the great diversity of humanity start to sound empty when a single system of study is everywhere. Can Ruhi really be appropriate to the needs of every community? I doubt it.

    A friend told me she over heard a couple of fundamentalist Christians talking about their study program and what they were trying to achieve with it and the similarity to the current efforts in the Faith struck her strongly. She took it positively, like, we’re all working on the same problems. I don’t read it so rosey.

  • Priscilla Gilman

    “Getting on the same page” never seemed to me to be a crying need in the Faith. On the contrary, it always bothered me that the same few quotes were trotted out endlessly to support the same stiff parrotted ideas. I can only imagine Ruhi is making this worse. I see a more diverse relationship to the writings in those on the web, and I think it is better.

    The passages an idividual memorizes should be chosen by the need of their own heart and mind. A good teacher to challenge you is a good thing too. But the words about valuing the great diversity of humanity start to sound empty when a single system of study is everywhere. Can Ruhi really be appropriate to the needs of every community? I doubt it.

    A friend told me she over heard a couple of fundamentalist Christians talking about their study program and what they were trying to achieve with it and the similarity to the current efforts in the Faith struck her strongly. She took it positively, like, we’re all working on the same problems. I don’t read it so rosey.