Happy St. Patrick’s Day To My Fellow Baha’is

bud-beer-ad-1963Today we are all either Irish, or honorary Irish.

Little known fact: although everyone refers to him as Saint Patrick, he was never officially canonized by any Pope. In anycase, I wonder how the original Patrick, saint or not, would feel to have his death commemorated by celebrations of Bacchus proportions.

One of the most obvious outward signs of being a Baha’i is that you don’t drink alcoholic beverages (unless as medicine). All Baha’is have stories to tell of a time they were given the opportunity to tell people about their faith due to such circumstances. So, rather than avoiding the celebrations today, Baha’is should take full advantage to get out there and mingle so they can tell people why they don’t drink!

Here is a “drinking story” told from the other perspective by Cary Enoch Reinstein:

If I hadn’t offered a pretty girl a can of beer at a 1963 Fourth of July party in the Berkeley Hills of northern California, I probably wouldn’t have come across the Baha’i Faith quite so soon.

Her name was Sandra. She stood out because she was the only one not drinking alcohol. I asked her why. She said she was a Baha’i, and Baha’is aren’t permitted to drink. She later told me she was a fifth-generation Baha’i raised in Japan, where her mother was on the National Spiritual Assembly.

Sandra’s great-great-grandmother attended Abdul-Baha’s talk at Stanford University in 1912, where He presented her with a Baha’i ring of orange jade and gold. Sandra was wearing that ring when I met her.

I asked her what Baha’i meant. Being raised Jewish, it sounded to me like the name of a Jewish organization – B’nai B’rith. As she was explaining the Baha’i Faith, I put down my just-opened beer can and haven’t picked one up since.

A friend of mine was at a corporate cocktail party, hobnobbing with the executives at his place of work (a Fortune 500 company). The vice-president knew he was a Baha’i and didn’t drink. But unbeknownst to the VP, a colleague had dashed off to the bathroom and asked my Baha’i friend to hold her cocktail for her.

So there he was, standing there trying to hold a cocktail the “proper way” in his hands when his boss approaches and with a glare asks, I thought you were a Baha’i and didn’t drink?

He responded, Sir, if you would just hold that thought, it will be answered momentarily.

The boss was puzzled and they stood there awkwardly for a few seconds until finally the colleague returned and whisking away the cocktail said, Oh, thanks for holding that.

:-)

So a very special St. Patrick’s day to my fellow Baha’is… and all my present and future friends.

May you be blessed with unequaled eloquence (even if you haven’t kissed the Blarney stone) and may you live to be a hundred.

And may my voice be the last you hear.

  • Anonymous

    [quote post="392"]And may my voice be the last you hear.[/quote]
    Ummm… Is that some kind of spooky curse? It sounds ominous. What do you have in store for us, Baquia?

  • http://mavaddat.livejournal.com Mavaddat

    [quote post="392"]And may my voice be the last you hear.[/quote]
    Ummm… Is that some kind of spooky curse? It sounds ominous. What do you have in store for us, Baquia?

  • http://www.bahairants.com Baquia

    It is a line I stole from ol’ blue eyes. I think he meant, may you live to be 100 but may I outlive you ;-)

    [quote comment=""][quote post="392"]And may my voice be the last you hear.[/quote]
    Ummm… Is that some kind of spooky curse? It sounds ominous. What do you have in store for us, Baquia?[/quote]

  • http://www.bahairants.com Baquia

    It is a line I stole from ol’ blue eyes. I think he meant, may you live to be 100 but may I outlive you ;-)

    [quote comment=""][quote post="392"]And may my voice be the last you hear.[/quote]
    Ummm… Is that some kind of spooky curse? It sounds ominous. What do you have in store for us, Baquia?[/quote]

  • Anonymous

    [quote post="392"]It is a line I stole from ol’ blue eyes. I think he meant, may you live to be 100 but may I outlive you ;-)[/quote]
    Ohh. I thought you meant that you were planning on A) talking while you assassinated each of us, B) talking loudly at our respective death beds, or C) saying some last word before deafening each of us. Or maybe some mix of the above. I’m relieved that it was just a joke… or was it?

  • http://mavaddat.livejournal.com Mavaddat

    [quote post="392"]It is a line I stole from ol’ blue eyes. I think he meant, may you live to be 100 but may I outlive you ;-)[/quote]
    Ohh. I thought you meant that you were planning on A) talking while you assassinated each of us, B) talking loudly at our respective death beds, or C) saying some last word before deafening each of us. Or maybe some mix of the above. I’m relieved that it was just a joke… or was it?

  • Bird out of the Cage

    Baquia-

    Blarney is a good topic for the BR pages and I see a lot of blarney in not having a cold beer at the end of a hot day or (14 years or 36 years) for that matter. That attractive Guidance for a New Day the BF pitches would be a great pitch in any local Boston Pub today, Awe yes… I can see how well that would go… The Irish will toast to you anyway… “Here’s to the BF, leaving more beer for us!”

    So, in any event, I raise my cold Coors Light (raising in the air to my new cyber buddies) and giving you a true Irish wish from an Irish woman (among other “key ingredients). To life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness!

    An Irish Blessing

    (A Blessing from St. Patrick)

    May the road rise to meet you,
    May the wind be always at your back,
    May the sun shine warm upon your face,
    May the rains fall soft upon your fields,
    And, until we meet again,
    May God hold you in the hollow of His hand.

  • Bird out of the Cage

    Baquia-

    Blarney is a good topic for the BR pages and I see a lot of blarney in not having a cold beer at the end of a hot day or (14 years or 36 years) for that matter. That attractive Guidance for a New Day the BF pitches would be a great pitch in any local Boston Pub today, Awe yes… I can see how well that would go… The Irish will toast to you anyway… “Here’s to the BF, leaving more beer for us!”

    So, in any event, I raise my cold Coors Light (raising in the air to my new cyber buddies) and giving you a true Irish wish from an Irish woman (among other “key ingredients). To life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness!

    An Irish Blessing

    (A Blessing from St. Patrick)

    May the road rise to meet you,
    May the wind be always at your back,
    May the sun shine warm upon your face,
    May the rains fall soft upon your fields,
    And, until we meet again,
    May God hold you in the hollow of His hand.

  • http://www.bahairants.com Baquia

    Who said you can’t have a cold beer? There are some very good brews with little or no alcohol ;-)

    [quote comment=""]I see a lot of blarney in not having a cold beer at the end of a hot day [/quote]

    Mavaddat, I think Sinatra meant it in another more positive scenario… as in, being beside an old friend, on his/her deathbed. That’s the way I think of it, anyway.

  • http://www.bahairants.com Baquia

    Who said you can’t have a cold beer? There are some very good brews with little or no alcohol ;-)

    [quote comment=""]I see a lot of blarney in not having a cold beer at the end of a hot day [/quote]

    Mavaddat, I think Sinatra meant it in another more positive scenario… as in, being beside an old friend, on his/her deathbed. That’s the way I think of it, anyway.

  • Larry

    [quote post="392"]Little known fact: although everyone refers to him as Saint Patrick, he was never officially canonized by any Pope.[/quote]

    This is not at all unusual. The current Roman Catholic mechanism for declaring someone a saint developed after the schism between Rome and Constantinople, and Patrick was a pre-schism saint who is still commemorated in the Eastern Orthodox church. The more informal practice of those days is still followed by the Orthodox, who commemorate such saints as St. Herman of Alaska, St. Peter the Aleut, and St. John the Wonderworker of Shanghai and San Francisco, none of whom have been canonized by the Vatican.

  • Larry

    [quote post="392"]Little known fact: although everyone refers to him as Saint Patrick, he was never officially canonized by any Pope.[/quote]

    This is not at all unusual. The current Roman Catholic mechanism for declaring someone a saint developed after the schism between Rome and Constantinople, and Patrick was a pre-schism saint who is still commemorated in the Eastern Orthodox church. The more informal practice of those days is still followed by the Orthodox, who commemorate such saints as St. Herman of Alaska, St. Peter the Aleut, and St. John the Wonderworker of Shanghai and San Francisco, none of whom have been canonized by the Vatican.

  • proteus

    “Driving the snakes out of Ireland” meant the last deathblow to the pre-Celt culture. This was the culture that built the mounds and observatories that have stood longer than the pyramids. It is pretty horrific to see cultural genocide celebrated as a holiday, but who’s to stand in the way of the solar cult victors and their storytime.

  • proteus

    “Driving the snakes out of Ireland” meant the last deathblow to the pre-Celt culture. This was the culture that built the mounds and observatories that have stood longer than the pyramids. It is pretty horrific to see cultural genocide celebrated as a holiday, but who’s to stand in the way of the solar cult victors and their storytime.