• farhan

    Baquia, The fact that learning from a divine source provides spiritual growth, very different from the rational "left brain" objective knowledge, however necessary, and is to be adapted to the hearers, from age to age, is expressed by Paul in 1 Corinthians:
    3:1. And I, brethren, could not speak to you as unto spiritual, but as unto carnal. As unto little ones in Christ, 3:2. I gave you milk to drink, not meat: for you were not able as yet. But neither indeed are you now able: for you are yet carnal…. 3:7. Therefore, neither he that planteth is any thing, nor he that watereth: but God that giveth the increase….

    I find the strong reactions I met in our recent discussion comparing our reliance on God as a parent – child relation, involving growth, was instructive to me. My vision includes a dimension of Faith, reliance on some invisible and unproven reality, an unseen generous, life-giving intervention, and to some others, this belief is futile, childish and unfounded. Many of the messages I read here seem to express the feeling of having out-grown God, and of what I see as the arbitrating body instated in god's teachings, a reliance which is experienced as humiliating.

    This irrationality of Faith reminded me when Abdu’l-Baha met s scientist (Graham Bell, perhaps) who asked Him of the purpose of religion. Abdu’l-Baha asked him if science could distinguish between a drop of water and a drop of tear, and the scientist said yes. The next question was if science could distinguish between a tear of joy and a tear of sorrow, and the scientist said no. Abdu’l-Baha then replied, this is the role of religion. This discussion also reminded me of Ruhiyyih Khanum’s poem: This is Faith: <a href=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rc50F0504o” target=”_blank”>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rc50F0504o

  • http://www.intensedebate.com/people/farhan farhan

    Baquia, The fact that learning from a divine source provides spiritual growth, very different from the rational "left brain" objective knowledge, however necessary, and is to be adapted to the hearers, from age to age, is expressed by Paul in 1 Corinthians:
    3:1. And I, brethren, could not speak to you as unto spiritual, but as unto carnal. As unto little ones in Christ, 3:2. I gave you milk to drink, not meat: for you were not able as yet. But neither indeed are you now able: for you are yet carnal…. 3:7. Therefore, neither he that planteth is any thing, nor he that watereth: but God that giveth the increase….

    I find the strong reactions I met in our recent discussion comparing our reliance on God as a parent – child relation, involving growth, was instructive to me. My vision includes a dimension of Faith, reliance on some invisible and unproven reality, an unseen generous, life-giving intervention, and to some others, this belief is futile, childish and unfounded. Many of the messages I read here seem to express the feeling of having out-grown God, and of what I see as the arbitrating body instated in god's teachings, a reliance which is experienced as humiliating.

    This irrationality of Faith reminded me when Abdu’l-Baha met s scientist (Graham Bell, perhaps) who asked Him of the purpose of religion. Abdu’l-Baha asked him if science could distinguish between a drop of water and a drop of tear, and the scientist said yes. The next question was if science could distinguish between a tear of joy and a tear of sorrow, and the scientist said no. Abdu’l-Baha then replied, this is the role of religion. This discussion also reminded me of Ruhiyyih Khanum’s poem: This is Faith: <a href=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rc50F0504o” target=”_blank”>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rc50F0504o

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